Students’ charges pile up

By Olivia Tattory

Four Westminster Choir College students are now facing additional charges following a police search conducted in connection with the death of 18-year-old freshman Justin Warfield, of Columbia, Md.

Warfield died Oct. 17 after allegedly using heroin, police said.

Kieran Hunt, 19, of Piscataway, N.J., who was previously charged with strict liability, a first-degree offense, for allegedly injecting Warfield with the heroin, is also facing 11 other charges, police said. Hunt could face a maximum of 20 years in prison.

The additional search of Hunt’s Seabrook Hall room and vehicle resulted in charges including two counts of possession of heroin, possession of heroin with intent to distribute, three counts of possession of a hypodermic syringe, possession of Adderall without a prescription, possession of under 50 grams marijuana and three counts of drug paraphernalia including an empty glassine heroin bag.

Hunt’s lawyer could waive the arraignment appearance, which would only subject Hunt to a “ton of media,” said Mercer County Prosecutor’s office spokeswoman Casey DeBlasio.

Nicholas C. Landrum, of Mullica Hill, N.J., Bryan G. Smith, of Freehold, N.J., and Robert D. Kelly, of Danby, Vt., all charged with harassment, are also facing a slew of charges.

Landrum, 20, who is charged with possession of the drug Ecstasy, a third-degree offense, could face a maximum of five years in prison and $35,000 in fines. Other charges include possession of under 50 grams marijuana and two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, including bongs, pipes and a digital scale.

Smith, 19, is charged with two counts possession of under 50 grams marijuana, possession of an Adderall capsule without prescription and two counts possession of drug paraphernalia including baggies and a bong. Possession of Adderall without a prescription, a third-degree offense, carries a maximum of five years in prison and $35,000 in fines.

Kelly, 19, is facing charges of possession of under 50 grams marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia, a bong.

Because Smith’s and Kelly’s offenses are third and fourth degree, they could be eligible for Pre Trial Intervention (PTI), depending on their criminal backgrounds, said DeBlasio.

Keith Kemo, director of the Office of Community Standards, said the University is “looking at the matter very closely.”

“Public Safety does their own investigation parallel to any criminal investigation dealing with Rider students,” he added.

Kemo could not disclose specific punishments, because of privacy issues.

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