Social media bullies #notcool #classless

By Jen Maldonado
Most students on Rider’s campuses can be seen checking their Twitter and Instagram accounts in between those walks to class or to Cranberry’s. Many have stumbled upon two accounts, Rider Crushes and RiderUBaddies, which are causing quite the stir amongst the student body, leading administrators to take action in hopes of shutting down these accounts.
In an email sent to all students, Dean of Students Anthony Campbell made it clear that the sites are in no way affiliated with the university and the Division of Student Affairs has begun taking steps to find out the source of these accounts so the appropriate actions can be taken.

“The content of these sites is harassing, offensive, and highly objectionable and violates both the University’s Statement of Community Values and the University’s Anti-Harassment and Non-Discrimination Policy,” Campbell said in the email. “The sites also use Rider University trademarks without permission.”

Rider Crushes, which features an image of the Bronc wearing a Rider sweatshirt, shares tweets that are anonymously sent to the account revealing the “crushes” people have on other students. Some of the tweets published by the account are sexually crude and inappropriate.

The Instagram account RiderUBaddies posts pictures of “the hottest people walking on Rider’s campus,” according to its description. The account uses the Rider University logo as well, which is an unauthorized use of the university’s trademark.

This isn’t the first time Rider has had to deal with a social media account being created that centers around the student body. Last fall, a website, raterider.com, was launched in which pictures of female students were pitted against one another and then rated on their physical appearance. The administration quickly blocked the site from all Rider servers and soon after, the site was shut down and disciplinary action was taken on those responsible for creating the site.
When it comes to these Twitter and Instagram accounts, students seem to have mixed feelings.

“It’s just so immature,” said senior elementary education and psychology major Erica Hoff. “We’re adults, not in high school anymore, so why are people even bothering? It’s all so judgmental and unnecessary.”

Alexis Diaz, also a senior elementary education major, had a different opinion on the sites.

“I think it’s harmless and just kids being kids,” she said. “Sometimes Rider Crushes will give shout-outs like ‘Here’s to all those students who aren’t being named, you’re cute too.’ I don’t think it’s that bad.”

No matter what students may think of the site, Campbell stressed in his email that Rider is a place of learning and mutual respect.

“These sites serve only to offend and hurt people and the university will not tolerate actions that are antithhetical to its core values,” he said.
If students have any information regarding these social media accounts, they are urged to contact the dean’s office.

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