Encapsulating Rider’s time stamp on history

Mordechai Rozanski  and student Nick Lim fill the time capsule on April 27. Lim is a member of the sesquicentennial committee, which initiated  the time capsule and collected items from recent years.
Mordechai Rozanski and student Nick Lim fill the time capsule on April 27. Lim is a member of the sesquicentennial committee, which initiated the time capsule and collected items from recent years.

By Marie McVeigh 

Despite the stormy weather for the University Day celebrations, a ceremony was held before the burying of a time capsule that will be opened in 50 years at the bicentennial celebration.

The ceremony on April 17 featured speakers including Nick Lim, a senior history major and member of the sesquicentennial committee. Students, faculty and alumni all worked together to compile the time capsule, which contained many items collected from past and present years. Examples include Dr. Walt Browers Rider history publications, a certificate from an American flag that was flown over an American base in the Middle East, Rider athletics memorabilia, coursework, and a recent issue of The Rider News.

Today we anchor our sesquicentennial celebration of Rider University by placing our mark on Riders campus,§ said Lim. A mark that will last for the next 50 years.§

Many students, faculty and staff members attended the ceremony to honor Riders history. A committee has been working tirelessly for three years on the yearlong 150th celebration.

The series of events that has recently taken place is a culmination of all the work the committee has been doing. The 150th celebration has created opportunities for students, faculty, staff and alumni to come together and put a mark on history, organizers said. The historical perspective of the time capsule was such an opportunity.

I am happy to be able to share this time with everyone,§ said Natalie Pollard, director of alumni relations and a graduate of ’93 and ’98. This includes students who are here to celebrate, students of the future and certainly students of the past.§

Current Rider students were able to play a part in their schools history by either coming to the time capsule ceremony or even putting an item in.

Paige Lynne Morgans, a freshman arts administration major, has a friend who is president of Phi Beta Lambda. He put his final speech in the capsule.

I did not know what the time capsule was going to look like, so I came to see it before it went into the ground,§ said Morgans. The ceremony was very special.§

In addition to celebrating the time capsule, this ceremony also honored Anna Robbins, who was presented with a Sesquicentennial Medal of Excellence for her work at Rider.

Robbins is not only an alumna but also Riders longest-term employee, having worked many different jobs since her start in 1959. These wide-ranging roles include clerical assistant, payroll supervisor, manager of student accounts, and, since 1987, the bursar. Robbins often said she never worried about her job title as long as she was working with students.

I feel honored and privileged to have worked at Rider so long,§ said Robbins. There are so many professionals at Rider that contribute so much to this institution. On behalf on them, I am accepting this beautiful medal.§

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